Thursday, March 19, 2009

Let's save some fuel...

The crude oil price is back to the normal range and more and more cars are crowding the roads now. Some of you already heard about the hydrogen supplemented fuel where tiny amount of hydrogen is being feed to the petrol/diesel engines. The hydrogen is typically generated using a simple electrolysis process where current is passed through water to split it into hydrogen and oxygen gas. Some call this gas hydroxyl rather than hydrogen because it also contains oxygen. I spare you the technical details as millions of hits will return if you type hydroxyl in google. On the same note, I'm not going to dwell into the never ending debate whether this approach will actually save fuel. Ask google for that... :-)

Here are some photo of the most recent installation done by my colleagues. The vehicle is Perodua MyVi. The vehicle is 3-years old and already clocked around 150,000km. Pictured below is the homebrew electrolysis unit consisting of two cell and a bubbler. Noticed the small box on it.... Yeah, it's my digital PWM controller blogged earlier. All system go, working as planned.


The tubing brought from the rear of the car to the air intake filter.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Presumably the system uses electricity produced during braking, i.e. "energy scavenging", rather than being powered by the alternator?

There is no way to increase your fuel efficiency if the latter is the case.

Anonymous said...

Very cool system, but I don't understand how this saves fuel since the hydrogen generation process is being powered by the motor, albeit indirectly

Scott said...

The energy being used by the hydrogen generation process isn't used to directly boost the efficiency of the engine, but rather to unlock the potential energy stored inside the water. The hydrogen/oxygen burning in the engine is what provides the boost of energy.

Kabuki said...

What is really happening here is that in almost all cases, vehicle alternators are producing far more current than the vehicle uses during normal use. By using the otherwise wasted energy to convert the water to hydroxyl, we have the end benefit of then being able to burn that byproduct in the engine. The other advantage of adding additional hydrogen and oxygen to the combustion process is that the gasoline then burns more efficiently. The engine sensors also not e that there is more fuel present than it needs to run, and will trim down the fuel injected in to the engine to compensate. It doesn't make any sense from a thermodynamics point of view, but it does work.

robert said...

hydrogen generator
Agreed. I see many people building their own hydrogen generators to save money on gas bills. Seems like the trend is gonna rise soon and most of us would be running our cars on water.